1 in 3 homebuyers making offers sight-unseen: Takeaways for real estate agents

1 in 3 homebuyers making offers sight unseen
With properties selling like hotcakes, one out of three recent homebuyers made an offer on a home without seeing it in person, according to a new survey from high-tech brokerage Redfin. The finding underscores how leveraging new marketing technology and serving up as much property data and imagery a…
More info @ https://www.inman.com/2017/06/28/1-in-3-homebuyers-making-offers-sight-unseen-takeaways-for-real-estate-agents/?utm_source=inbrief&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=inbrief&utm_content=20170628%2B%2BREADMORE%2B1
1 in 3 homebuyers making offers sight-unseen: Takeaways for real estate agents Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 30, 2017 at 04:32PM

The Retirement Environment Index seeks to discover the complicated answer to the simple question: “Which state is most desirable for pre-retirees?” The LP Financial Research REI takes a holistic look at each state’s desirability for pre-retirees, ranking them based on a variety of factors considered important for many 45- to 64-year-old who trying to maximize their dollars as they start thinking about, if not actively planning, for retirement, as well as continuing to learn, work and socialize. This unique index looks specifically at the 45- to 64-year-old cohort (pre-retirees) and collectively assesses strengths and weaknesses of pre-retiree desirability on a state level, rather than city or regional level. Biggest Movers NEBRASKA – The New #1 Nebraska moved several spots higher to take the number one spot this year’s rankings. In doing so, it dethroned Virginia, which had maintained the top spot for two years running. Although Nebraska slipped one grade in Housing, improved scores in the Financial and Community Quality of Life subcategories helped the state power higher in the rankings. Virginia, for its part, still ranked highly in most categories, though a slight downgrade in the Financial subcategory (from an A to a B) pushed it to a still respectable seventh place this year.. RHODE ISLAND – Previous Ranking 36, Now 26 Moving from a B to an A in Healthcare helped Rhode Island move 10 spots higher this year. The state scored well across the board, but high rates of preventive health screenings and a lower rate of hospital discharges due to preventative issues were factors. The state also scored well in Employment and Education across the board, helping its overall rating. ALASKA – Previous Ranking 50, Now 39 Improvements in Financial and Community Quality of Life scores helped Alaska move 11 spots higher for 2017. Low poverty and foreclosure rates helped quality of life scores, while an increase in median income and slight decrease in a still relatively high cost of living helped move the Financial score higher. WISCONSIN – Previous Ranking 26, Now 16 Marginal declines in Financial, Healthcare, and Community Quality of Life scores led Wisconsin to fall from an overall score of A in 2015 to a C in 2016. While the state maintained an overall C rating for 2017 a bounce back in Healthcare and Community Quality of Life scores pulled the overall ranking ten spots higher to 16th. Above-average healthcare expenditures per capita, above-average rates of health insurance coverage, and high rates of preventive care helped move the overall Healthcare score higher. Declining poverty, foreclosure, and crime levels helped move the needle for Community Quality of Life.. WASHINGTON, D.C. – Previous Ranking 16, Now 30 Washington, D.C. saw the largest drop in rankings year over year, driven primarily by a decline in its Financial score. An increase in cost of living (where the district already ranked second highest of any state), coupled with continued low scores in Housing and Community Quality of Life hurt the district’s 2017 ranking. On the plus side however, Washington, D.C. continues to rate highly in the Healthcare and Employment and Education categories. NEW YORK – Previous Ranking 49, Now 51 Low Financial, Community Quality of Life, and Housing scores combined with a slight drop in Healthcare scores from an A to a still very respectable B were the largest drivers in New York’s fall to the bottom of this year’s rankings. California, which was at the bottom of last year’s rankings, managed to move one spot higher on a slight increase in its Housing score. Regional Trends The retirement environment in each state is unique, and some states differ vastly from neighboring states. However, regional trends are worth highlighting. States in the Midwest scored the best on averages this year (average 15th place out of 51 states), followed by the South. The West had the largest range of scores, with Wyoming ranking number five, and California coming in at number 50. Within each category, there are also distinct regional trends among the four major U.S. census regions (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West): Financial: The Midwest was the clear regional winner in the Financial category for 2017, with metrics in line with national averages except for cost of living, which is well below the national average, and just below that of the South. The Northeast’s higher cost of living and tax burden pulled average financial scores lower for the region. Healthcare: The Northeast remains the standout in the Healthcare category, doing well in most subcategories that demonstrate excellent access to, and cost of, quality care. The Midwest trails in this metric across all subcategories. Housing: The Midwest leads, followed closely by the South, based primarily on broad housing affordability. The Northeast trails for the same reason. Community Quality of Life: The South comes in at the top of our ranking, with high scores across all metrics. The Northeast came in at the bottom this year due to higher crime and foreclosure rates. Employment and Education: The Northeast stands out, followed by the West. The Northeast’s advantage is driven by higher college degree attainment rates and higher employment rates. The Midwest trailed. Wellness: The Northeast and the South were strong across all categories, whereas the Midwest followed behind, largely due to higher levels of obesity and lower life expectancy for 65 year olds.

lpl-research.com

More info @ http://lpl-research.com/~rss/Thought_Leadership/TL_Retirement_Environment_Index_2017.pdf
The Retirement Environment Index seeks to discover the complicated answer to the simple question: “Which state is most desirable for pre-retirees?”

The LP Financial Research REI takes a holistic look at each state’s desirability for pre-retirees, ranking them based on a variety of factors considered important for many 45- to 64-year-old who trying to maximize their dollars as they start thinking about, if not actively planning, for retirement, as well as continuing to learn, work and socialize.

This unique index looks specifically at the 45- to 64-year-old cohort (pre-retirees) and collectively assesses strengths and weaknesses of pre-retiree desirability on a state level, rather than city or regional level.

Biggest Movers

NEBRASKA – The New #1

Nebraska moved several spots higher to take the number one spot this year’s rankings. In doing so, it dethroned Virginia, which had maintained the top spot for two years running. Although Nebraska slipped one grade in Housing, improved scores in the Financial and Community Quality of Life subcategories helped the state power higher in the rankings. Virginia, for its part, still ranked highly in most categories, though a slight downgrade in the Financial subcategory (from an A to a B) pushed it to a still respectable seventh place this year..

RHODE ISLAND – Previous Ranking 36, Now 26

Moving from a B to an A in Healthcare helped Rhode Island move 10 spots higher this year. The state scored well across the board, but high rates of preventive health screenings and a lower rate of hospital discharges due to preventative issues were factors. The state also scored well in Employment and Education across the board, helping its overall rating.

ALASKA – Previous Ranking 50, Now 39

Improvements in Financial and Community Quality of Life scores helped Alaska move 11 spots higher for 2017. Low poverty and foreclosure rates helped quality of life scores, while an increase in median income and slight decrease in a still relatively high cost of living helped move the Financial score higher.

WISCONSIN – Previous Ranking 26, Now 16

Marginal declines in Financial, Healthcare, and Community Quality of Life scores led Wisconsin to fall from an overall score of A in 2015 to a C in 2016. While the state maintained an overall C rating for 2017 a bounce back in Healthcare and Community Quality of Life scores pulled the overall ranking ten spots higher to 16th. Above-average healthcare expenditures per capita, above-average rates of health insurance coverage, and high rates of preventive care helped move the overall Healthcare score higher. Declining poverty, foreclosure, and crime levels helped move the needle for Community Quality of Life..

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Previous Ranking 16, Now 30

Washington, D.C. saw the largest drop in rankings year over year, driven primarily by a decline in its Financial score. An increase in cost of living (where the district already ranked second highest of any state), coupled with continued low scores in Housing and Community Quality of Life hurt the district’s 2017 ranking. On the plus side however, Washington, D.C. continues to rate highly in the Healthcare and Employment and Education categories.

NEW YORK – Previous Ranking 49, Now 51

Low Financial, Community Quality of Life, and Housing scores combined with a slight drop in Healthcare scores from an A to a still very respectable B were the largest drivers in New York’s fall to the bottom of this year’s rankings. California, which was at the bottom of last year’s rankings, managed to move one spot higher on a slight increase in its Housing score.

Regional Trends

The retirement environment in each state is unique, and some states differ vastly from neighboring states. However, regional trends are worth highlighting. States in the Midwest scored the best on averages this year (average 15th place out of 51 states), followed by the South. The West had the largest range of scores, with Wyoming ranking number five, and California coming in at number 50. Within each category, there are also distinct regional trends among the four major U.S. census regions (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West):

Financial: The Midwest was the clear regional winner in the Financial category for 2017, with metrics in line with national averages except for cost of living, which is well below the national average, and just below that of the South. The Northeast’s higher cost of living and tax burden pulled average financial scores lower for the region.

Healthcare: The Northeast remains the standout in the Healthcare category, doing well in most subcategories that demonstrate excellent access to, and cost of, quality care. The Midwest trails in this metric across all subcategories.

Housing: The Midwest leads, followed closely by the South, based primarily on broad housing affordability. The Northeast trails for the same reason.

Community Quality of Life: The South comes in at the top of our ranking, with high scores across all metrics. The Northeast came in at the bottom this year due to higher crime and foreclosure rates.

Employment and Education: The Northeast stands out, followed by the West. The Northeast’s advantage is driven by higher college degree attainment rates and higher employment rates. The Midwest trailed.

Wellness: The Northeast and the South were strong across all categories, whereas the Midwest followed behind, largely due to higher levels of obesity and lower life expectancy for 65 year olds. Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 29, 2017 at 10:51PM

“As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the neighborhood safe? How much will my property taxes be? Will my home become more valuable in the future when it’s time to sell? To help out those who are house hunting, GOBankingRates.com determined the best city to buy a home in every state, taking into account various factors, including school districts, property tax bills, home prices and incomes. Whether you’re looking to start a family or make money off investment property in the near future, check out our picks of the best places to live.” Some examples” Alabama: Madison Median property tax bill: $763 Median home listing price: $228,775 Median household income: $92,965 Madison is located in the Huntsville Metro Area, which has been experiencing economic prosperity due to its growing research, technology and manufacturing industries, according to Sperling’s Best Places. In fact, Alabama as a whole is the best state for your money in 2017, according to another GOBankingRates study. The median home value in Madison is $196,500, which is about $74,000 higher than the median home value in Alabama. According to Zillow, home values are expected to continue increasing in the Madison area. Arizona: Tucson Median property tax bill: $1,701 Median home listing price: $179,000 Median household income: $37,149 The housing bubble hit Arizona particularly hard, but some housing markets have rebounded. Home prices in Tucson are affordable, especially compared to prices in Phoenix ($250,000) and Scottsdale ($564,000). Take note, however, that incomes in Tucson are low. But, if you can find a higher-paying job in this city, your paycheck will likely stretch further. Arkansas: Jonesboro Median property tax bill: $698 Median home listing price: $172,500 Median household income: $40,583 Jonesboro has a low median home listing price on top of relatively low property taxes. Memphis, Tenn., is actually located close to Jonesboro and boasts cheaper homes. However, homebuyers — especially families looking to settle in and start a new life — might be turned off by Memphis’ high crime rates. California: Los Gatos Median property tax bill: $5,275 Median home listing price: $1,899,000 Median household Income: $122,860 Los Gatos might be one of the most expensive places to buy a home, but a high cost of living comes with benefits. For example, Los Gatos schools spend more per student than the national average, according to Sperling’s. And, nearly 70 percent of the population has graduated from a four-year college. Another great aspect of Los Gatos is the city’s very low crime rates — both violent and property crime rates are below the U.S. average.”

The Best City in Every State to Buy a Home | GOBankingRates
As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the…
More info @ https://www.gobankingrates.com/mortgage-rates/best-city-state-buy-home/
“As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the neighborhood safe? How much will my property taxes be? Will my home become more valuable in the future when it’s time to sell?

To help out those who are house hunting, GOBankingRates.com determined the best city to buy a home in every state, taking into account various factors, including school districts, property tax bills, home prices and incomes. Whether you’re looking to start a family or make money off investment property in the near future, check out our picks of the best places to live.”

Some examples”
Alabama: Madison

Median property tax bill: $763
Median home listing price: $228,775
Median household income: $92,965
Madison is located in the Huntsville Metro Area, which has been experiencing economic prosperity due to its growing research, technology and manufacturing industries, according to Sperling’s Best Places. In fact, Alabama as a whole is the best state for your money in 2017, according to another GOBankingRates study.

The median home value in Madison is $196,500, which is about $74,000 higher than the median home value in Alabama. According to Zillow, home values are expected to continue increasing in the Madison area.

Arizona: Tucson

Median property tax bill: $1,701
Median home listing price: $179,000
Median household income: $37,149
The housing bubble hit Arizona particularly hard, but some housing markets have rebounded. Home prices in Tucson are affordable, especially compared to prices in Phoenix ($250,000) and Scottsdale ($564,000). Take note, however, that incomes in Tucson are low. But, if you can find a higher-paying job in this city, your paycheck will likely stretch further.

Arkansas: Jonesboro

Median property tax bill: $698
Median home listing price: $172,500
Median household income: $40,583
Jonesboro has a low median home listing price on top of relatively low property taxes. Memphis, Tenn., is actually located close to Jonesboro and boasts cheaper homes. However, homebuyers — especially families looking to settle in and start a new life — might be turned off by Memphis’ high crime rates.

California: Los Gatos

Median property tax bill: $5,275
Median home listing price: $1,899,000
Median household Income: $122,860
Los Gatos might be one of the most expensive places to buy a home, but a high cost of living comes with benefits. For example, Los Gatos schools spend more per student than the national average, according to Sperling’s. And, nearly 70 percent of the population has graduated from a four-year college. Another great aspect of Los Gatos is the city’s very low crime rates — both violent and property crime rates are below the U.S. average.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 26, 2017 at 11:39AM

While athletes overall generally fare better than their non-athlete counterparts, female athletes have the biggest advantage of all. A recent study by EY Women Athletes Business Network and espnW surveyed more than 400 female executives in five countries (20% were U.S. women). Of the top executives, more than half competed in collegiate sports, and only 3% of the women never participated in sports at all… Failure recovery: Winters defines this as the ability to fail and immediately bounce back. “This lesson in sports not only prepares them for what will happen in the real world, but it teaches them the mental toughness necessary to move beyond failures and still find success,” she says. Coach-ability: “As coaches, we try to impress upon our athletes that their way may not always be right,” she explains. “The willingness to accept feedback and translate it into action—whether it be a new hitting technique or a new pitch they learn—allows them to be better college players and employees for the many different bosses they will have.” Control the “controllables”: An athlete’s attitude, effort and engagement are all aspects of the game that they can control. It’s important for athletes to focus on these aspects that they can impact by their own decisions, and adapt to those outside of their control like the weather, umpires or the game’s outcome. “You control how you react and recover. In the workplace, the same rings true. Your effort and output matter, regardless of the circumstances that are out of your control,” she says. Work ethic: Athletes know what it’s like to work when they are tired, hurting, lacking sleep and so much more. They know how to push themselves just to make it to the next inning. Winters explains, “Athletes see the big picture and are diligent in the details, knowing that the ‘little things’ often matter the most.” Leadership: Winters points out that athletes not only understand how to be leaders, but also how to lead in the right direction. “Athletes know how to rally others behind them and push everyone’s mindset in the right direction,” she says. A focus on the team: Being a great teammate is not just about supporting each other during the highlights, but also pulling each other up when someone is falling behind. And this is a great skill to have in the ups and downs of the workplace. “When athletes see a teammate who is struggling, they are going to go out of their way to bring her back into the fold. They are competitive, but use it to push each other to be the best version of themselves possible.”

6 reasons former athletes find success after college
USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunitie…
More info @ http://usatodayhss.com/2017/6-reasons-former-athletes-find-success-after-college
While athletes overall generally fare better than their non-athlete counterparts, female athletes have the biggest advantage of all. A recent study by EY Women Athletes Business Network and espnW surveyed more than 400 female executives in five countries (20% were U.S. women). Of the top executives, more than half competed in collegiate sports, and only 3% of the women never participated in sports at all…

Failure recovery: Winters defines this as the ability to fail and immediately bounce back. “This lesson in sports not only prepares them for what will happen in the real world, but it teaches them the mental toughness necessary to move beyond failures and still find success,” she says.
Coach-ability: “As coaches, we try to impress upon our athletes that their way may not always be right,” she explains. “The willingness to accept feedback and translate it into action—whether it be a new hitting technique or a new pitch they learn—allows them to be better college players and employees for the many different bosses they will have.”
Control the “controllables”: An athlete’s attitude, effort and engagement are all aspects of the game that they can control. It’s important for athletes to focus on these aspects that they can impact by their own decisions, and adapt to those outside of their control like the weather, umpires or the game’s outcome. “You control how you react and recover. In the workplace, the same rings true. Your effort and output matter, regardless of the circumstances that are out of your control,” she says.
Work ethic: Athletes know what it’s like to work when they are tired, hurting, lacking sleep and so much more. They know how to push themselves just to make it to the next inning. Winters explains, “Athletes see the big picture and are diligent in the details, knowing that the ‘little things’ often matter the most.”
Leadership: Winters points out that athletes not only understand how to be leaders, but also how to lead in the right direction. “Athletes know how to rally others behind them and push everyone’s mindset in the right direction,” she says.
A focus on the team: Being a great teammate is not just about supporting each other during the highlights, but also pulling each other up when someone is falling behind. And this is a great skill to have in the ups and downs of the workplace. “When athletes see a teammate who is struggling, they are going to go out of their way to bring her back into the fold. They are competitive, but use it to push each other to be the best version of themselves possible.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 04:08PM

Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May Hits second lowest since July 2004

Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May
Borrowers are going into default on their first mortgages less often than at nearly any point in the last 13 years, a new report from the S&P Dow Jones Indices and Experian showed. The default rate in May was just one basis point above May 2016’s level of 0.63%, which was the lowest that figure had…
More info @ https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40475-mortgage-default-rate-falls-to-near-record-low-in-may?eid=311694375&bid=1791352
Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May
Hits second lowest since July 2004 Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:07AM

California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher – Existing, single-family home sales totaled 430,060 in May on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 5.4 percent from April and 2.6 percent from May 2016. – May’s statewide median home price was $550,200, up 2.3 percent from April and up 5.8 percent from May 2016. – At the regional level, the San Francisco Bay Area, Inland Empire, and Los Angeles metro area all registered year-to-year sales increases of 4.9 percent, 9 percent, and 6.9 percent, respectively.

May home sales and price report
California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher.
More info @ http://www.car.org/aboutus/mediacenter/newsreleases/2017releases/may2017sales
California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher

– Existing, single-family home sales totaled 430,060 in May on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 5.4 percent from April and 2.6 percent from May 2016.

– May’s statewide median home price was $550,200, up 2.3 percent from April and up 5.8 percent from May 2016.

– At the regional level, the San Francisco Bay Area, Inland Empire, and Los Angeles metro area all registered year-to-year sales increases of 4.9 percent, 9 percent, and 6.9 percent, respectively. Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:06AM

Illinois housing market makes gains in May with higher home sales and prices
Statewide home sales picked up in May and properties sold quickly even as median prices tracked higher than a year ago, according to Illinois REALTORS®. Statewide home sales (including single-famil…
More info @ http://blog.illinoisrealtors.org/2017/06/illinois-housing-market-gains-higher-home-sales-prices/
Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:05AM

“I’ve been selling real estate for 25 years and this is the strongest seller’s market I have ever seen in my entire real estate career,” said David Fogg, a real estate agent with Keller Williams in Burbank, California. “A lot of our sellers are optimistically pricing their homes in today’s market, and I have to say in most cases we’re getting the home sold anyway.”

Homes are flying off fast this spring in the ‘strongest seller’s market ever’
Spring home buyers are pounding the pavement at a furious pace, but the pickings are getting ever slimmer.
More info @ http://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/24/spring-housing-strongest-sellers-market-ever.html
“I’ve been selling real estate for 25 years and this is the strongest seller’s market I have ever seen in my entire real estate career,” said David Fogg, a real estate agent with Keller Williams in Burbank, California. “A lot of our sellers are optimistically pricing their homes in today’s market, and I have to say in most cases we’re getting the home sold anyway.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 21, 2017 at 02:21PM