“As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the neighborhood safe? How much will my property taxes be? Will my home become more valuable in the future when it’s time to sell? To help out those who are house hunting, GOBankingRates.com determined the best city to buy a home in every state, taking into account various factors, including school districts, property tax bills, home prices and incomes. Whether you’re looking to start a family or make money off investment property in the near future, check out our picks of the best places to live.” Some examples” Alabama: Madison Median property tax bill: $763 Median home listing price: $228,775 Median household income: $92,965 Madison is located in the Huntsville Metro Area, which has been experiencing economic prosperity due to its growing research, technology and manufacturing industries, according to Sperling’s Best Places. In fact, Alabama as a whole is the best state for your money in 2017, according to another GOBankingRates study. The median home value in Madison is $196,500, which is about $74,000 higher than the median home value in Alabama. According to Zillow, home values are expected to continue increasing in the Madison area. Arizona: Tucson Median property tax bill: $1,701 Median home listing price: $179,000 Median household income: $37,149 The housing bubble hit Arizona particularly hard, but some housing markets have rebounded. Home prices in Tucson are affordable, especially compared to prices in Phoenix ($250,000) and Scottsdale ($564,000). Take note, however, that incomes in Tucson are low. But, if you can find a higher-paying job in this city, your paycheck will likely stretch further. Arkansas: Jonesboro Median property tax bill: $698 Median home listing price: $172,500 Median household income: $40,583 Jonesboro has a low median home listing price on top of relatively low property taxes. Memphis, Tenn., is actually located close to Jonesboro and boasts cheaper homes. However, homebuyers — especially families looking to settle in and start a new life — might be turned off by Memphis’ high crime rates. California: Los Gatos Median property tax bill: $5,275 Median home listing price: $1,899,000 Median household Income: $122,860 Los Gatos might be one of the most expensive places to buy a home, but a high cost of living comes with benefits. For example, Los Gatos schools spend more per student than the national average, according to Sperling’s. And, nearly 70 percent of the population has graduated from a four-year college. Another great aspect of Los Gatos is the city’s very low crime rates — both violent and property crime rates are below the U.S. average.”

The Best City in Every State to Buy a Home | GOBankingRates
As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the…
More info @ https://www.gobankingrates.com/mortgage-rates/best-city-state-buy-home/
“As every prospective homebuyer knows, there’s a lot that goes into buying a new home beyond just its listing price. You have to ask yourself: Does this city have a strong education system? Is the neighborhood safe? How much will my property taxes be? Will my home become more valuable in the future when it’s time to sell?

To help out those who are house hunting, GOBankingRates.com determined the best city to buy a home in every state, taking into account various factors, including school districts, property tax bills, home prices and incomes. Whether you’re looking to start a family or make money off investment property in the near future, check out our picks of the best places to live.”

Some examples”
Alabama: Madison

Median property tax bill: $763
Median home listing price: $228,775
Median household income: $92,965
Madison is located in the Huntsville Metro Area, which has been experiencing economic prosperity due to its growing research, technology and manufacturing industries, according to Sperling’s Best Places. In fact, Alabama as a whole is the best state for your money in 2017, according to another GOBankingRates study.

The median home value in Madison is $196,500, which is about $74,000 higher than the median home value in Alabama. According to Zillow, home values are expected to continue increasing in the Madison area.

Arizona: Tucson

Median property tax bill: $1,701
Median home listing price: $179,000
Median household income: $37,149
The housing bubble hit Arizona particularly hard, but some housing markets have rebounded. Home prices in Tucson are affordable, especially compared to prices in Phoenix ($250,000) and Scottsdale ($564,000). Take note, however, that incomes in Tucson are low. But, if you can find a higher-paying job in this city, your paycheck will likely stretch further.

Arkansas: Jonesboro

Median property tax bill: $698
Median home listing price: $172,500
Median household income: $40,583
Jonesboro has a low median home listing price on top of relatively low property taxes. Memphis, Tenn., is actually located close to Jonesboro and boasts cheaper homes. However, homebuyers — especially families looking to settle in and start a new life — might be turned off by Memphis’ high crime rates.

California: Los Gatos

Median property tax bill: $5,275
Median home listing price: $1,899,000
Median household Income: $122,860
Los Gatos might be one of the most expensive places to buy a home, but a high cost of living comes with benefits. For example, Los Gatos schools spend more per student than the national average, according to Sperling’s. And, nearly 70 percent of the population has graduated from a four-year college. Another great aspect of Los Gatos is the city’s very low crime rates — both violent and property crime rates are below the U.S. average.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 26, 2017 at 11:39AM

While athletes overall generally fare better than their non-athlete counterparts, female athletes have the biggest advantage of all. A recent study by EY Women Athletes Business Network and espnW surveyed more than 400 female executives in five countries (20% were U.S. women). Of the top executives, more than half competed in collegiate sports, and only 3% of the women never participated in sports at all… Failure recovery: Winters defines this as the ability to fail and immediately bounce back. “This lesson in sports not only prepares them for what will happen in the real world, but it teaches them the mental toughness necessary to move beyond failures and still find success,” she says. Coach-ability: “As coaches, we try to impress upon our athletes that their way may not always be right,” she explains. “The willingness to accept feedback and translate it into action—whether it be a new hitting technique or a new pitch they learn—allows them to be better college players and employees for the many different bosses they will have.” Control the “controllables”: An athlete’s attitude, effort and engagement are all aspects of the game that they can control. It’s important for athletes to focus on these aspects that they can impact by their own decisions, and adapt to those outside of their control like the weather, umpires or the game’s outcome. “You control how you react and recover. In the workplace, the same rings true. Your effort and output matter, regardless of the circumstances that are out of your control,” she says. Work ethic: Athletes know what it’s like to work when they are tired, hurting, lacking sleep and so much more. They know how to push themselves just to make it to the next inning. Winters explains, “Athletes see the big picture and are diligent in the details, knowing that the ‘little things’ often matter the most.” Leadership: Winters points out that athletes not only understand how to be leaders, but also how to lead in the right direction. “Athletes know how to rally others behind them and push everyone’s mindset in the right direction,” she says. A focus on the team: Being a great teammate is not just about supporting each other during the highlights, but also pulling each other up when someone is falling behind. And this is a great skill to have in the ups and downs of the workplace. “When athletes see a teammate who is struggling, they are going to go out of their way to bring her back into the fold. They are competitive, but use it to push each other to be the best version of themselves possible.”

6 reasons former athletes find success after college
USA TODAY High School Sports has a weekly column on the college recruiting process. Here, you’ll find practical tips and real-world advice on becoming a better recruit to maximize your opportunitie…
More info @ http://usatodayhss.com/2017/6-reasons-former-athletes-find-success-after-college
While athletes overall generally fare better than their non-athlete counterparts, female athletes have the biggest advantage of all. A recent study by EY Women Athletes Business Network and espnW surveyed more than 400 female executives in five countries (20% were U.S. women). Of the top executives, more than half competed in collegiate sports, and only 3% of the women never participated in sports at all…

Failure recovery: Winters defines this as the ability to fail and immediately bounce back. “This lesson in sports not only prepares them for what will happen in the real world, but it teaches them the mental toughness necessary to move beyond failures and still find success,” she says.
Coach-ability: “As coaches, we try to impress upon our athletes that their way may not always be right,” she explains. “The willingness to accept feedback and translate it into action—whether it be a new hitting technique or a new pitch they learn—allows them to be better college players and employees for the many different bosses they will have.”
Control the “controllables”: An athlete’s attitude, effort and engagement are all aspects of the game that they can control. It’s important for athletes to focus on these aspects that they can impact by their own decisions, and adapt to those outside of their control like the weather, umpires or the game’s outcome. “You control how you react and recover. In the workplace, the same rings true. Your effort and output matter, regardless of the circumstances that are out of your control,” she says.
Work ethic: Athletes know what it’s like to work when they are tired, hurting, lacking sleep and so much more. They know how to push themselves just to make it to the next inning. Winters explains, “Athletes see the big picture and are diligent in the details, knowing that the ‘little things’ often matter the most.”
Leadership: Winters points out that athletes not only understand how to be leaders, but also how to lead in the right direction. “Athletes know how to rally others behind them and push everyone’s mindset in the right direction,” she says.
A focus on the team: Being a great teammate is not just about supporting each other during the highlights, but also pulling each other up when someone is falling behind. And this is a great skill to have in the ups and downs of the workplace. “When athletes see a teammate who is struggling, they are going to go out of their way to bring her back into the fold. They are competitive, but use it to push each other to be the best version of themselves possible.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 04:08PM

Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May Hits second lowest since July 2004

Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May
Borrowers are going into default on their first mortgages less often than at nearly any point in the last 13 years, a new report from the S&P Dow Jones Indices and Experian showed. The default rate in May was just one basis point above May 2016’s level of 0.63%, which was the lowest that figure had…
More info @ https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40475-mortgage-default-rate-falls-to-near-record-low-in-may?eid=311694375&bid=1791352
Mortgage default rate falls to near record low in May
Hits second lowest since July 2004 Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:07AM

California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher – Existing, single-family home sales totaled 430,060 in May on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 5.4 percent from April and 2.6 percent from May 2016. – May’s statewide median home price was $550,200, up 2.3 percent from April and up 5.8 percent from May 2016. – At the regional level, the San Francisco Bay Area, Inland Empire, and Los Angeles metro area all registered year-to-year sales increases of 4.9 percent, 9 percent, and 6.9 percent, respectively.

May home sales and price report
California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher.
More info @ http://www.car.org/aboutus/mediacenter/newsreleases/2017releases/may2017sales
California housing market bounces back in May as sales and median home price perk higher

– Existing, single-family home sales totaled 430,060 in May on a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, up 5.4 percent from April and 2.6 percent from May 2016.

– May’s statewide median home price was $550,200, up 2.3 percent from April and up 5.8 percent from May 2016.

– At the regional level, the San Francisco Bay Area, Inland Empire, and Los Angeles metro area all registered year-to-year sales increases of 4.9 percent, 9 percent, and 6.9 percent, respectively. Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:06AM

Illinois housing market makes gains in May with higher home sales and prices
Statewide home sales picked up in May and properties sold quickly even as median prices tracked higher than a year ago, according to Illinois REALTORS®. Statewide home sales (including single-famil…
More info @ http://blog.illinoisrealtors.org/2017/06/illinois-housing-market-gains-higher-home-sales-prices/
Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 22, 2017 at 09:05AM

“I’ve been selling real estate for 25 years and this is the strongest seller’s market I have ever seen in my entire real estate career,” said David Fogg, a real estate agent with Keller Williams in Burbank, California. “A lot of our sellers are optimistically pricing their homes in today’s market, and I have to say in most cases we’re getting the home sold anyway.”

Homes are flying off fast this spring in the ‘strongest seller’s market ever’
Spring home buyers are pounding the pavement at a furious pace, but the pickings are getting ever slimmer.
More info @ http://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/24/spring-housing-strongest-sellers-market-ever.html
“I’ve been selling real estate for 25 years and this is the strongest seller’s market I have ever seen in my entire real estate career,” said David Fogg, a real estate agent with Keller Williams in Burbank, California. “A lot of our sellers are optimistically pricing their homes in today’s market, and I have to say in most cases we’re getting the home sold anyway.” Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 21, 2017 at 02:21PM

#malibubreakshomesrecords

Malibu Sales Volume Heading for Smash Record
Malibu real estate will have its greatest year ever in 2017. It is a foregone conclusion. Even with the year not half over, you can lock it in. By more
More info @ http://www.malibutimes.com/news/article_970790e0-5327-11e7-bf15-4ba3fba6212b.html
#malibubreakshomesrecords Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 20, 2017 at 06:16PM

U.S. Needs 4.6M New Apartments by 2030 to Keep Pace with Demand Posted on June 13, 2017 by Admin Growing Demand is Due to Aging Population, Immigration, Declining Home Purchases Washington, D.C. – June 12, 2017 (BUSINESS WIRE) Delayed marriages, an aging population and international immigration are increasing a pressing need for new apartments, to the tune of 4.6 million by 2030, according to a new study commissioned by the National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) and the National Apartment Association (NAA). It’s important to note that: Currently, nearly 39 million people live in apartments, and the apartment industry is quickly exceeding capacity; In the past five years, an average of one million new renter households were formed every year, which is a record amount; and, It will take building an average of at least 325,000 new apartment homes every year to meet demand; yet, on average, just 244,000 apartments were delivered from 2012 through 2016. Based on research conducted by Hoyt Advisory Services and commissioned by NAA and NMHC, the data includes an estimate of the future demand for apartments in the United States, the 50 states and 50 metro areas, including the District of Columbia. For the purposes of this study, apartments are defined as rental apartments in buildings with five or more units. The data are available on the website www.WeAreApartments.org. We Are Apartments Logo The increased demand for apartments is due in large part to: Delayed house purchases. Life events such as marriage and children are the biggest drivers of home ownership. In 1960, 44 percent of all households in the U.S. were married couples with children. Today, it’s less than one in five (19 percent), and this trend is expected to continue. The aging population. People ages 65-plus will account for a large part of population growth going forward across all states. The research shows older renters are helping to drive future apartment demand, particularly in the northeast, where renters ages 55-plus will account for more than 30 percent of rental households. Immigration. International immigration is assumed to account for approximately half (51 percent) of all new population growth in the U.S., with higher growth expected in the nation’s border states. This population increase will contribute to the rising demand for apartments. Research has shown that immigrants have a higher propensity to rent and typically rent for longer periods of time. “We’re experiencing fundamental shifts in our housing dynamics, as more people are moving away from buying houses and choosing apartments instead. More than 75 million people between 18 and 34 years old are entering the housing market, primarily as renters,” said Dr. Norm Miller, Principle at Hoyt Advisory Services and Professor of Real Estate at the University of San Diego. “But renting is not just for the younger generations anymore. Increasingly, Baby Boomers and other empty nesters are trading single-family houses for the convenience of rental apartments. In fact, more than half of the net increase in renter households over the past decade came from the 45-plus demographic.” “Apartment rentals are on the rise, and this trend is expected to continue at least through 2030, which means we’ll need millions of new apartments in the U.S. to meet the increased demand. The western U.S. as well as states such as Texas, Florida and North Carolina are expected to have the greatest need for new apartment housing through 2030, although all states will need more apartment housing moving forward,” said NAA Chair Cindy Clare, CPM. “The need is for all types of apartments and at all price points.” There will also be a growing need for renovations and improvements on existing apartment buildings, which will provide a boost in jobs (and the economy) nationwide. Hoyt’s research found that 51 percent of the apartment stock was built before 1980, which translates into 11.7 million units that could need upgrading by 2030. The older stock is highly concentrated in the northeast. “The growing demand for apartments – combined with the need to renovate thousands of apartment buildings across the country – will make a significant and positive impact on our nation’s economy for years to come,” explained NMHC Chair Bob DeWitt. “For frame of reference, apartments and their 39 million residents contribute $1.3 trillion to the national economy. As the industry continues to grow, so will this tremendous economic contribution.” Other highlights from the report include: Demand is expected to be especially significant in Raleigh, N.C., with a 69.1 percent increase in new apartment units between now and 2030, Orlando, Fla. (56.7 percent), and Austin, Texas (48.7 percent). Also notable, the demand in the New York City metro area will call for an additional 278,634 apartment units, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas (266,296 new units), and Houston, Texas (214,176 new units). Propensity to rent is higher in high-growth and high-cost states. Hundreds of thousands of new rental units will be needed by 2030 in states such as California, Georgia, Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, Nevada, New York, Texas, Virginia and Washington. In conjunction with the study’s release, the website www.WeAreApartments.org breaks down the data by each state and 50 key metro areas. Visitors can also use the Apartment Community Estimator – or ACE – a tool that allows users to see the trends in their state or metro area to determine the potential economic impact locally. For more information, visit www.WeAreApartments.org. For more than 25 years, the National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) and the National Apartment Association (NAA) have partnered on behalf of America’s apartment industry. Drawing on the knowledge and policy expertise of staff in Washington, D.C., as well as the advocacy power of 170 NAA state and local affiliated associations, NAA and NMHC provide a single voice for developers, owners and operators of multifamily rental housing. Today, more than one-third of Americans rent their housing and 39 million people live in an apartment home. For more information, please visit www.nmhc.org or www.naahq.org. Contacts Adrienne Walkowiak (603) 659-9345 Adrienne@AdrienneWalkowiak.com

We Are Apartments
United States Apartments Support 12.3m Jobs and contribute $1.3t to the Economy.
More info @ http://www.weareapartments.org/
U.S. Needs 4.6M New Apartments by 2030 to Keep Pace with Demand
Posted on June 13, 2017 by Admin
Growing Demand is Due to Aging Population, Immigration, Declining Home Purchases

Washington, D.C. – June 12, 2017 (BUSINESS WIRE) Delayed marriages, an aging population and international immigration are increasing a pressing need for new apartments, to the tune of 4.6 million by 2030, according to a new study commissioned by the National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) and the National Apartment Association (NAA). It’s important to note that:

Currently, nearly 39 million people live in apartments, and the apartment industry is quickly exceeding capacity;
In the past five years, an average of one million new renter households were formed every year, which is a record amount; and,
It will take building an average of at least 325,000 new apartment homes every year to meet demand; yet, on average, just 244,000 apartments were delivered from 2012 through 2016.
Based on research conducted by Hoyt Advisory Services and commissioned by NAA and NMHC, the data includes an estimate of the future demand for apartments in the United States, the 50 states and 50 metro areas, including the District of Columbia. For the purposes of this study, apartments are defined as rental apartments in buildings with five or more units. The data are available on the website http://www.WeAreApartments.org.

We Are Apartments Logo

The increased demand for apartments is due in large part to:

Delayed house purchases. Life events such as marriage and children are the biggest drivers of home ownership. In 1960, 44 percent of all households in the U.S. were married couples with children. Today, it’s less than one in five (19 percent), and this trend is expected to continue.
The aging population. People ages 65-plus will account for a large part of population growth going forward across all states. The research shows older renters are helping to drive future apartment demand, particularly in the northeast, where renters ages 55-plus will account for more than 30 percent of rental households.
Immigration. International immigration is assumed to account for approximately half (51 percent) of all new population growth in the U.S., with higher growth expected in the nation’s border states. This population increase will contribute to the rising demand for apartments. Research has shown that immigrants have a higher propensity to rent and typically rent for longer periods of time.
“We’re experiencing fundamental shifts in our housing dynamics, as more people are moving away from buying houses and choosing apartments instead. More than 75 million people between 18 and 34 years old are entering the housing market, primarily as renters,” said Dr. Norm Miller, Principle at Hoyt Advisory Services and Professor of Real Estate at the University of San Diego. “But renting is not just for the younger generations anymore. Increasingly, Baby Boomers and other empty nesters are trading single-family houses for the convenience of rental apartments. In fact, more than half of the net increase in renter households over the past decade came from the 45-plus demographic.”

“Apartment rentals are on the rise, and this trend is expected to continue at least through 2030, which means we’ll need millions of new apartments in the U.S. to meet the increased demand. The western U.S. as well as states such as Texas, Florida and North Carolina are expected to have the greatest need for new apartment housing through 2030, although all states will need more apartment housing moving forward,” said NAA Chair Cindy Clare, CPM. “The need is for all types of apartments and at all price points.”

There will also be a growing need for renovations and improvements on existing apartment buildings, which will provide a boost in jobs (and the economy) nationwide. Hoyt’s research found that 51 percent of the apartment stock was built before 1980, which translates into 11.7 million units that could need upgrading by 2030. The older stock is highly concentrated in the northeast.

“The growing demand for apartments – combined with the need to renovate thousands of apartment buildings across the country – will make a significant and positive impact on our nation’s economy for years to come,” explained NMHC Chair Bob DeWitt. “For frame of reference, apartments and their 39 million residents contribute $1.3 trillion to the national economy. As the industry continues to grow, so will this tremendous economic contribution.”

Other highlights from the report include:

Demand is expected to be especially significant in Raleigh, N.C., with a 69.1 percent increase in new apartment units between now and 2030, Orlando, Fla. (56.7 percent), and Austin, Texas (48.7 percent). Also notable, the demand in the New York City metro area will call for an additional 278,634 apartment units, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas (266,296 new units), and Houston, Texas (214,176 new units).
Propensity to rent is higher in high-growth and high-cost states.
Hundreds of thousands of new rental units will be needed by 2030 in states such as California, Georgia, Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, Nevada, New York, Texas, Virginia and Washington.
In conjunction with the study’s release, the website http://www.WeAreApartments.org breaks down the data by each state and 50 key metro areas. Visitors can also use the Apartment Community Estimator – or ACE – a tool that allows users to see the trends in their state or metro area to determine the potential economic impact locally.

For more information, visit http://www.WeAreApartments.org.

For more than 25 years, the National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) and the National Apartment Association (NAA) have partnered on behalf of America’s apartment industry. Drawing on the knowledge and policy expertise of staff in Washington, D.C., as well as the advocacy power of 170 NAA state and local affiliated associations, NAA and NMHC provide a single voice for developers, owners and operators of multifamily rental housing. Today, more than one-third of Americans rent their housing and 39 million people live in an apartment home. For more information, please visit http://www.nmhc.org or http://www.naahq.org.

Contacts

Adrienne Walkowiak
(603) 659-9345
Adrienne@AdrienneWalkowiak.com Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 15, 2017 at 09:05PM

The new valuation tool is from LendingTree, which announced Wednesday that it is rolling out a new home valuation feature within its financial intelligence platform, My LendingTree. According to details from the company, any of My LendingTree’s 5 million current users (or anyone else who signs up for the service) will now have the ability to get a valuation of their home within LendingTree’s system. https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40425-lendingtree-unveils-its-own-zestimate-style-home-valuation-tool

LendingTree unveils its own Zestimate-style home valuation tool
Consumer-facing home valuation tools, especially Zillow’s “Zestimate”, has long been a source of consternation in the housing industry. And while Zillow’s tool is mainly designed for people looking to buy or sell a home, there’s a new home valuation tool on the market for people looking to buy, sell…
More info @ https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40425-lendingtree-unveils-its-own-zestimate-style-home-valuation-tool
The new valuation tool is from LendingTree, which announced Wednesday that it is rolling out a new home valuation feature within its financial intelligence platform, My LendingTree.

According to details from the company, any of My LendingTree’s 5 million current users (or anyone else who signs up for the service) will now have the ability to get a valuation of their home within LendingTree’s system.
https://www.housingwire.com/articles/40425-lendingtree-unveils-its-own-zestimate-style-home-valuation-tool Positive Real Estate News – http://www.facebook.com/pages/p/166701730035514
June 15, 2017 at 09:03PM